What is emotional intelligence

What is emotional intelligence

characteristics of emotional intelligence

However, IQ is only one measure of our capabilities. There are many other types of intelligence besides intellect. For example, spatial intelligence is the ability to think in 3D. Musical intelligence is the ability to recognize rhythm, cadence, and pitch. Athletic, artistic, and mechanical skills are other types of intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand, use, and control our emotions. Emotional intelligence is sometimes abbreviated as EQ (or EI). Just as a high IQ can predict high test scores, a high EQ can predict success in social and emotional situations. EI helps us build strong relationships, make good decisions, and cope with difficult situations.

Some people have natural EQ skills. Others have to work at it. The good news is that everyone can get better at it. Unlike IQ, people can improve their emotional intelligence, if they know how.

the emotionally intelligent workplace: how to select for, measure, and improve emotional intelligence in individuals, groups, and organizationsbook

On the other hand, the psychologist Daniel Goleman built the concept of emotional intelligence, deepening this type of intelligence proposed by Gardner. This does not necessarily depend on emotions, but also on correct thinking and emotional development. It is thus divided into different types and categories that may be essential to know in order to be successful in professional life.

Emotional intelligence is defined as a set of skills that a person acquires by birth or learns during his life, where empathy, self-motivation, self-control, enthusiasm and emotion management stand out.

This type of intelligence does not consist of altering the capacity to generate emotions with respect to different environmental stimuli, but is more related to the reaction that a person has to them, which are often more shocking than the emotions themselves that trigger this action.

Emotional intelligence is not a single one. It encompasses different types and characteristics that define the IQ (ci) of an aspect of a person. These can be divided into five basic categories:

emotional intelligence – wikipedia

Joy, nervousness, surprise, anger, calm, disappointment? Managing the cataract of emotions that we live every day is not easy. However, emotional intelligence is increasingly gaining ground as a way to achieve happiness in any area of our lives, including work. Are you ready to learn how to be happy?

Emotions influence our daily lives. That is why the publication of the book Emotional Intelligence in 1995 by the American psychologist Daniel Goleman launched this discipline to global stardom. Even the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) launched an initiative in 2002 by which it sent the education ministers of 140 countries a declaration with ten basic principles for implementing social and emotional learning programs.

Can properly managing emotions lead to happiness? Emotional intelligence helps to overcome negative attitudes, beliefs and habits that condition and limit us, preventing us from reaching our full potential. Timothy Gallwey, author of numerous books for the development of personal and professional excellence, said in this sense that the performance in our lives can be represented with a simple equation: R (performance) = P (potential) – I (interferences). In other words, the less negative emotional interferences we have, the more potential we will have.

types of emotional intelligence

Emotional intelligence (EI) is a construct that refers to the ability of individuals to recognize their own and others’ emotions, discriminate between different feelings and label them appropriately, use emotional information to guide thought and behavior, and manage or adjust emotions to adapt to the environment or achieve goals.[1][2] Popular definitions make cognitive aspects important, such as memory and the ability to solve cognitive problems, however Edward L. Thorndike, in 1920, used the term social intelligence to describe social intelligence.

Popular definitions of intelligence make cognitive aspects important, such as memory and the ability to solve cognitive problems, however Edward L. Thorndike, in 1920, used the term social intelligence to describe the ability to understand and motivate other people.[3] In 1940, David Wechsler described the influence of non-intellectual factors on intelligent behavior and further argued that intelligence tests would not be complete until these factors could be adequately described.[4] The first use of the term emotional intelligence was to describe the ability to understand and motivate other people.[4] The first use of the term emotional intelligence was in the 1940s.

The first use of the term emotional intelligence is generally attributed to Wayne Payne, who cites it in his doctoral dissertation A study of emotions: the development of emotional intelligence (1985).[7] However, this expression had already appeared earlier in texts by Beldoch (1964),[8] and Leuner (1966).[9] Stanley Greenspan also proposed a model of emotional intelligence in 1989, as did Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer.[10] The term was also used in the literature of the University of California, Berkeley.[11] The term emotional intelligence is also used in the literature of the University of California, Berkeley.

Entradas relacionadas

Esta web utiliza cookies propias para su correcto funcionamiento. Al hacer clic en el botón Aceptar, acepta el uso de estas tecnologías y el procesamiento de tus datos para estos propósitos. Más información
Privacidad